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The Thread
Act XIII

FishThis

quote:

Originally posted by Pacific Specifics

Sorry, he is right, base rock is completely dry and devoid of any life. It can only be seeded with some live rock.

No, it's not.
Base rock is just that, base rock.
It's generally pieces of live rock with no coralline on it.
Dead rock, is dead rock, or dry rock. Base rock is most certainly not dry or dead.






Pacific Specifics

quote:

Originally posted by FishThis


No, it's not. Base rock is just that, base rock. It's generally pieces of live rock with no coralline on it. Dead rock, is dead rock, or dry rock. Base rock is most certainly not dry or dead.


Ref.: wikipedia
"Base Rock is a generic term for aragonite rocks which have no bacterial organisms or coralline algae growing in or on the rock. Base rock is often used as filler rock in the marine aquarium as it is much cheaper to purchase than live rock."



Anyways, the problem is obviously that some people (such as yourself) use the term for "low life" live rock, making it confusing.

But, through out all my research, base rock, when used as a noun, is almost always describing what you call "dry rock" that can be seeded with live rock. Why this is not something you have heard is odd.

It's semantics, but the seller WAS correct, and you got to learn something.   wink






FishThis

Just because wiki says something doesn't make it true. Pretty much anyone can go in and type in wiki. Read some of the coral stuff on there, it's absolute garbage.

If it's dry, it's dry rock.

If it's live rock with no coralline, it's base rock.
That's how everyone I know uses the terms, and everyone I've ever met.




Sal

quote:

Originally posted by Pacific Specifics

Sorry, he is right, base rock is completely dry and devoid of any life. It can only be seeded with some live rock.


Not true.
Base rock can also mean very uninteresting live rock ... it sells for $2 a pound.


Damselblue's live rock is not "dry," OR "with
no bacterial organisms or coralline algae
growing in or on the rock."
It's not entirely uninteresting either.






Pacific Specifics

quote:

Originally posted by Sal

Not true. Base rock can also mean very uninteresting live rock ... it sells for $2 a pound.


They are using the term "base" as an adjective for any rock under the rest of your rock.

Of course, if it were applied to live rock, it would be the ugliest, or "base live rock." Refer to the post above for the "accepted" definition of "base rock."

Anyways, my point was that the seller was NOT wrong as Damselblue stated trying to make him look incompetent.






damselblue

quote:

Originally posted by FishThis

That's how everyone I know uses the terms, and everyone I've ever met.


Me too.


(Don't quote me on this, but I think that
cheering may be coming from the peanut gallery.)







Pacific Specifics

quote:
Originally posted by FishThis

If it's dry, it's dry rock. If it's live rock with no coralline, it's base rock. That's how everyone I know uses the terms, and everyone I've ever met.

Sorry you're not used to being wrong, but you are.

I said there was middle ground, but you seem to not see anything except your own way. With that in mind, I have to respond.

There have even been a couple of threads since this one I have seen showing how the term is used, much less the countless times in every thread I have ever seen the term used.

Anyways, I have a feeling that no evidence will ever supercede your perfect opinion, FishThis can never be wrong.

Wiki is wrong, I am wrong, everyone in those threads are wrong.

I guess we all have been fooled and look like idiots, and FishThis and Damselblue are right, because he says so ... at least I presented something to back myself up.   wink

Anyways, no mas para mi (no more for me) ... this is a petty argument.





FishThis

Pacific Specifics,
If you're right, then what's the difference between dry rock and base rock?






Pacific Specifics

quote:
Originally posted by FishThis

If you're right, then what's the difference between dry rock and base rock?


I don't have the burden of proof.
You do.
I have provided plenty to support myself.

You are the one dealing in finite answers and not accepting multiple definitions.

I have already stated that it can be confusing using nouns that have adjectives in them, and that all the definitions are correct in their own right.


This is what he said: ... base rock when
used as a noun is almost always
describing what you call "dry rock"
that can be seeded with live rock ..."




But, there ARE "the most commonly accepted definitions," which I have been referring to from the start.

You are the one saying that in no way is "base rock" ever considered to be dry live rock, which is ENTIRELY 100% WRONG.

Anyways, there is no difference between those terms, as I just said. And there does not have to be one, this is language, not math.

My only point was to defend the seller's accused "incompetence" by showing that his definition is in fact the most commonly accepted definition of base rock. And not wrong in any way, as YOU keep saying.

That's where the burden of proof lies, YOU supported Damselblue's accusation.






damselblue

FishThis ... thank you for the support.

I really appreciate it.


Okay, everyone. I want to keep this thread going. I don't want the mods to shut it down.

When I meant it looked like base rock, I didn't know it would turn into an argument. I'm sorry about that.

The type of base rock I was referring to was Live Base Rock. Not dead, dry base rock.



Wait a minute! LIVE Base Rock ?
ANOTHER adjective!
I'm getting really confused!




I have found online that it is sold both ways so, technically, both of the parties are correct.




OH BOY! ... now we're gonna get technical !!

So, if Damselblue is saying that BOTH parties are correct,
I wonder if this means that ALL parties are correct
... Birdfish included?

Would this mean that Damselblue is taking back what she said before ... quote:
"BASE ROCK IS NOT VOID OF ALL LIFE AS YOU STATE BIRDFISH." ...??




Every book though, that I have picked up states that ... Base rock has little marine life on it  and is used as a base for a reef structure with nicer pieces placed on top.

THAT is the type of base rock I was referring to.

Okay ... THAT is the type of rock
Damselblue was referring to ...
I've got it now.
But, what has this got to do
with Damselblue's live rock?
Damselblue says that she has
marine organisms and coralline algae
on her live rock ... which is definitely
NOT the same description as having
"little marine life on it."
It seems to me that it is
NEITHER "dead, dry base rock"
~OR~ "live base rock" ...
... not base rock at all since
Damselblue said it had various critters on it.
She never said it had "little marine life on it" ...
rather, she described lots of life.




Anyway, what I meant was ... it looks like
 Live Base Rock.

I'm going off of these books I have purchased and still have. The Natural Reef Aquarium, The New Marine Aquarium, and The Simple Guide to Mini-Reef Aquariums.

I thought I remembered reading it in The Conscientious Marine Aquarist by Robert Fenner as well. Those other three for sure, but the Robert Fenner I'll have to look at more.

Let's not get this thread shut down.
PLEASE ... it's very important.




I wonder why it's so important ...?




Pincher
I can't believe people make such big deals about rocks.

LOL ... rocks are rocks.

The name "Super Ultra Premium " is only for extra revenue. It IS the same rock.


Pssssssst ... it's not all the same live rock.
(Really ... there are different grades of live rock.)


I always buy the FUGLIEST and CHEAPEST base rocks from my LFS ... like $1 a pound.... heh in 3 months, the acros have encrusted all over them and they are gleaming with thick purple coralline.... premium super fiji, fugly LFS rock ... what's the difference?

They will all get smothered with coralline in a few months.  






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